Every NFL Team’s Best (and Worst) 1st-Round Draft Pick of the Super Bowl Era

The NFL draft is intoxicating because the event provides hope for every fanbase. Each first-round pick is a future Hall of Famer…until he takes the field.

Once the games begin, each of the top selections undertakes  cheap nike nfl jerseys from china a divergent path based on numerous factors including situation, coaching staff, fit and everything that encompasses being a professional athlete.

Organizations hope they find a quality starter. None expect a Hall of Fame-caliber performer. Yet a lucky few emerge. Each of the 32 franchises made at least one of these selections in the opening frame since the Super Bowl era began in 1966. 6893d459cb4f6927baa5af13700481f5_crop_exactcheap official nike nfl jerseys

Then, there are those everyone wants to forget. Amazing talents that, for whatever reason, never clicked and live in infamy. The league’s worst draft picks won’t find their busts in Canton. They’re simply busts.

Best: Larry Fitzgerald

Fitzgerald has gotten better with age. The 2004 third overall pick has caught 325 passes since turning 32 in 2015, and he’s still going. Overall, the 11-time Pro Bowler ranks third all-time with 1,234 receptions and 15,545 receiving yards. Fitzgerald should eclipse Terrell Owens’ 15,934 receiving yards during the nfl cheap nike jerseys 2018 campaign and take second place. The 6’3″, 218-pound target came into the league making acrobatic catches before developing into an ideal slot receiver later in his career. He made the transition because he’s an exceptional route-runner with velcro for hands. new nike nfl jerseys for sale cheap

Worst: Steve Little

Only five specialists have been first-round picks in the Super Bowl era. Normally, kickers and punters wouldn’t even be included in this conversation. Yet Little’s awful three-year career must be noted. Roberto Aguayo falls on the butt end of many jokes after being a 2016 second-round pick of cheap wholesale nike nfl jerseys¬† the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and struggling. Imagine taking a specialist in the first round only to have him convert 48.1 percent of his field-goal attempts and average 38.5 yards per punt. The Cardinals don’t have to imagine after wasting the 15th overall pick in 1978 on one.